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Anand, Viswanathan (2775) - Carlsen, Magnus (2870) [C67]
World Chess Championship, Chennai (4) 2013

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4








   
5. d4
The Berlin Variation of the Spanish Game.
5...Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2
Or 14. a4 a5 15. Rd2 c5 16. Rad1 Bc6 17. e6 fxe6 18. Ne5 Re8, with equality in Berg, E - Hammer, J, Achaea 2012.
14...c5








   
15. Rad1
A novelty. In the game Jakovenko, D - Almasi, Z, Khanty-Mansiysk 2007, White played 15. Ne4, and after 15...b6 16. Ng3 Bc6 (16...Ng6!?) 17. Nh2 Ng6 18. Re1 Nf4 19. f3 Kb7 Black had good counterplay. Jon Ludvig Hammer is one of the seconds of Magnus Carlsen. Peter Leko is one of the seconds of Viswanathan Anand. I played two games against Peter Leko, and two games against Zoltan Almasi. It's a small world!
15...Be6 16. Ne1
A dubious move. The alternatives are 16. Ne2 and 16. b3. After the game at the press conference Anand said: "Something went horribly wrong in the opening: I made one illogical move after the next".
16...Ng6 17. Nd3 b6
Weaker is 17...c4? 18. Nc5 Nxe5 19. f4 Nc6 20. Nxe6 fxe6 21. Rd7, and White is better.








   
18. Ne2?
A mistake. Now Black can grab the a-pawn. Better is 18. b3 c4 19. bxc4 Bxc4 20. f4 Kb7, though Black has excellent counterplay.
18...Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7!
Black finishes the development of pieces, intends to activate his rooks, has a small edge due to an extra pawn.








   
23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4!
The only move. White seizes space on the kingside and tries to push the passed e-pawn.
24...Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5?!
More precise is 27.Rc2.
27...hxg4?!
Better is 27...a6! 28. Nd4 hxg4 29. hxg4 a5, followed by ...a4, with a clear edge to Black.








   
28. hxg4?!
Now better is 28.Rc2! Nd5, and White can sacrifice the knight with 29.Nb4! with good counterplay in all lines thanks to the powerful e5-pawn and rooks: 29...Nxb4 30. Rxc7+ Ka6 (30...Kb8 31. Rxf7) 31. Nd6 b5 32. hxg4 Kb6 33. Rxf7. A fantastic resource!
28...Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6!
The best continuation. Black takes under his control the important central squares and plans ...a6 or ...a5-a4.
30. Rc2!? a5!








   
31. Rc4!
White stops the ...a5-a4 advance.
31...g6! 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8








   
35. Ne4!
A very strong move, with the idea of Nd6+. White sacrifices a pawn, but activates the king.
35...Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+
More precise is 36...Rd8, but Black has a small (or not big) advantage: 37. Ke3 (bad is 37. Ned6+? cxd6 38. Rxg4 Ne5 39. Rc7+ Kb8 40. Rd4 Bxb5) 37...Rd5 38. Nbc3 Re5 39. Kf3, with the better chances in the ending after 39...Rgxe4 40. Rxe4 Rxe6 41. Rxe6 Nd4+ 42. Ke3 Nxe6.
37. Ke3








   
37...Rf8?!
Better is 37...g5 38. Rg1 (38. Nxg5? Rf5) 38...Rh4 39. Rxg5 Rh7 40. Rg8 Re7 41. Ng5 Nb4, with a small advantage to Black.
38. Nd4!
White attacks! An exciting fight!
38...Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+








   
41. Kc3
More precise is 41. Ke3 Rd5 42. Rh7 Bb5 43. Rf7 Rh8 44. Rcc7 Rd3+ 45. Kf4 Be8 46. Rfe7 Rh4+ 47. Kg5 Rxe4 48. Rxe8, with equality.
41...Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3
Black has a small advantage.
43. Rc8








   
43...Rdd3
Or 43...Rxc8 44. Rxc8 Rxe4 45. Rxe8 g5 46. Rg8 Rxe6 47. Rxg5, and the rook engame "two pawns vs one pawn" is drawn.
44. Ra8+
After 44. R1c4 Rxb3+ (44...Re2+ 45. Kc1 Rh3 46. Ra8+ Kb7 47. Rd8) 45. Kc2 Rb4 46. Rxb4 axb4 47. Nd6 Bc6 48. Rxc6 Rxe6 49. Kb3 g5 50. Kc4 the position is equal.
44...Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3








   
47. Rc3
If White can trade one rook, then the endgame is drawn.
47...Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4








   
61. Rxg4
This is a draw.
61...axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3
Draw. 1/2-1/2










Move
   

Anand, Viswanathan (2775) - Carlsen, Magnus (2870) [C67]
World Chess Championship/Chennai (4) 2013

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne1 Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 hxg4 28. hxg4 Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5 31. Rc4 g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 35. Ne4 Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 1/2-1/2


Game 4 Anand - Carlsen live with commentary and analysis by Boris Schipkov

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© 2013 Boris Schipkov