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A Dramatic and Thrilling Chess Game: A Fight in Zeitnot!

Paehtz, Thomas Sr (2450) - Schipkov, Boris [D36]
Miskolc open 1989

Notes by Boris Schipkov

I played against the Champion of GDR (East Germany) Thomas Paehtz in Hungary in 1989. Lutz Espig and Thomas Paehtz shared first place with 9 from 13 scores in the DDR Championship 1988 in Stralsund. Before the game I had seen few chess magazines about half an hour and prepared a novelty. We lived in the University campus and watched satellite TV at night. I remember I watched The Hitchhiker and Flesh And Blood by Paul Verhoeven.

1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 c6 7. Bd3 Nbd7 8. Qc2 Nh5 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Nge2 g6 11. O-O-O
The move 11.0-0 is also interesting.








   
11...Ndf6
This was my "novelty". I saw that after 11...Nb6 White had some initiative with 12. Ng3 Ng7 13. Kb1 Bd7 14. Rc1 O-O-O 15. Na4 Nxa4 16. Qxa4 Kb8 17. Rc3 b6 18. Ba6, Kasparov, G - Andersson, U, Reykjavik 1988. Therefore I decided to play 11...Ndf6, defending the h5-knight, and if White would continue 12.Ng3 then Black could simply develop his queenside with ...Be6, followed by ...0-0-0. However, the move 11...Ndf6 was played in Stahlberg, G - Guimard, C, Mar del Plata 1941, 12. Kb1 Ng7 13. Ng3 Bd7 14. Rhe1 O-O-O 15. e4 dxe4 16. Ngxe4. It was novelty for me, but not for my opponent
12. h3!
This continuation I did not analyse then. My clock ticked faster and faster.
12...Ng7 13. g4 Be6
13...O-O 14. Rdg1 and 13...Bd7 are also possible.
14. Kb1 O-O-O 15. f3 Kb8 16. e4








   
16...c5?!
The move 16...dxe4! is better, 17. fxe4 g5!? (17...Nfe8) 18. Qd2 Nd7 19. h4 (19. d5 Ne5) 19...h6 20. Qe3 Ka8 21. Qg3 Nb6 with counterplay.
17. g5! Nfe8?!
Again 17...dxe4! is better, 18. fxe4 Nfe8 with a minimal advantage to White.
18. exd5?!
The correct continuation is 18. dxc5! Qxg5 (18...Nc7 19. c6! with attack) 19. c6 dxe4 (19...bxc6 20. Nd4!) 20. Bxe4 Nc7 21. cxb7 and White has a clear edge.
18...Bxd5 19. Nxd5
Or 19. Be4!? Bxe4 20. Nxe4 cxd4 21. Nxd4 Nc7.
19...Rxd5








   
20. Be4!?
An insidious plot. 20. Rhe1 is interesting also.
20...Rxg5 21. h4








   
21...Rg2!
The strongest answer. After 21...Rh5 White beautifully sacrifices another pawn 22. Nf4!! Rxh4 23. Nd5 Qd8 24. Rxh4 Qxh4 25. dxc5 f5 (25...Ne6 26. Qb3!) 26. c6! with a winning attack.
22. dxc5 Nf6
Or 22...f5!? 23. Bd3 Nf6 with good counterplay. Bad is 22...Nf5? 23. Qc3 Rg8 24. Nf4 Rg3 25. Rhe1.
23. c6!
The only move.
23...Rc8!?
Or 23...Re8 24. Rhe1 (24. Rd4 Nf5 25. Rc1 Qc7 26. Ra4 b6 27. Qc3 Nxe4 28. fxe4 Rxe2 29. exf5) 24...Qc7 25. Qc3 Nxe4 26. Qxg7 Nd6 27. Nd4 Rc8 28. Rc1 Qb6 29. Nb3 Rxc6 30. Qf8+ Nc8 31. Qxf7 Qc7.
24. Qd3! bxc6 25. Nf4 Rg3 26. Rhe1
White obtains compensation for a pawn.
26...Qc7 27. Qc3!
The next brilliant trap.








   
27...Nge8!?
If 27...Qxf4? then 28. Qb3+ Kc7 (28...Ka8 29. Bxc6+! Rxc6 30. Rd8+) 29. Bxc6!! and White gets a devastating attack on the black monarch. But 27...Nxe4 28. Rxe4 Nf5 is also playable.
28. Rc1 Nxe4 29. Rxe4 Nd6 30. Rb4+ Ka8 31. Qe3
31. Rb3 is more precise.
31...Nf5 32. Qf2 Qe7?
Time trouble. A very quick preparation before the game and long calculations lead to deficit of time. Correct is 32...Rd8 with a small edge to Black.








   
33. Re4?
An error. After 33. Nd5! Qd7 34. Ra4! Rb8 35. Rxc6! Rg2 (35...Rh3 36. Rcc4 Rh1+ 37. Kc2 Rxh4 38. f4 Rh2 39. Qxh2 Qxd5 40. Qf2) 36. Rxa7+ Qxa7 37. Qxg2 Rd8 38. Qd2 Ne7 39. Rc7 Qg1+ 40. Rc1 Qa7 41. Nc7+ Qxc7 42. Rxc7 Rxd2 43. Rxe7 White has a superiority in the endgame.
33...Qd6 34. Ra4 Rc7 35. Qe2 Qe7?
A mistake in severe time trouble. 35...Re7 is better, 36. Re4 h6 with sufficient counterplay.
36. Re4 Qd7
In the case of 36...Qd6 White is better after 37. Rd1 Qc5 38. Qa6 Rb7 39. Rd8+ Rb8 40. Rxb8+ Kxb8 41. Re8+ Kc7 42. Nd5+! Qxd5 43. Qxa7+ Kd6 44. Rd8+ Ke6 45. Rxd5 cxd5.
37. Re8+?
Zeitnot. Here we were in the mutual time trouble and both began to play in a blitz tempo before the end of the game. The move 37. Rd1! is correct, 37...Nd6 38. Qf1 g5 39. Nh5 gxh4 40. Nxg3 hxg3 41. Qg2 Rc8 42. Red4 Qf5+ 43. Ka1 Nb5 44. Rd8.
37...Rc8 38. Rxc8+ Qxc8 39. Nd5?!
White has more or less equal game after 39. Qe4 Nd6 40. Qd4 Nb5 41. Qe3.








   
39...Qd7?!
Black could get good winning chances in the ending with a knight move 39...Nd4! 40. Qe4 (40. Qe5 Qf5) 40...Qf5 41. Nb4 Kb7 42. Qxf5 gxf5 43. f4 Rf3.
40. Qa6! Qb7 41. Qa3
Or 41. Qa5 Rg2 42. b3 Nd6 43. Nc7+ Kb8 44. Na6+ Ka8 45. Rd1 Qd7 with equality.
41...Rg2!
Improving the rook's position.
42. b3
Or 42. Qf8+ Qb8 43. Nc7+ Kb7 44. Qb4+ Kc8 45. Nb5 Ne7 46. Qxe7 Qxb5.








   
42...Nd4!
Now all black pieces stand on the good places.
43. Qf8+ Qb8 44. Qxf7 Qc8 45. Ne7 Qd7! 46. Qc4 Qxe7 47. Qxd4 Kb7 48. a4 Rh2 49. a5 Qe6!?
After 49...Rxh4 50. f4 (50. a6+ Kxa6 51. Rxc6+ Kb7 52. Qd5 Rh5 53. Re6+ Rxd5 54. Rxe7+ Ka6 55. Rxh7 Rd3 56. f4 Rxb3+ 57. Ka2 Rb7 58. Rh8 Ka5 59. Rf8) 50...Qe6 51. Qb4+ Kc8 (51...Ka6 52. Qa4 Qf5+) 52. a6 Qd7 the chances are even.
50. a6+! Kxa6 51. Qa4+ Kb7 52. Qb4+ Ka6
Or 52...Kc8 53. Qb5.
53. Rc5?
Threatening 54.Ra5 mate. But White must play 53. Qa4+ with perpetual check.
53...Rh1+ 54. Kb2 Qe2+ 55. Rc2 Qe5+ 56. Rc3








   
56...Qe2+?
Black could have a clear edge in this endgame with 56...Rh2+! 57. Ka3 Qb5. The moves 57...Qa5+ and 57...Qf6 are also possible.
A very dramatic game, more thrilling than Verhoeven's films. But I think we must prepare openings for games more seriously. In such cases we can escape zeitnot and play in comfortable situation.
57. Rc2 Qe5+
Draw by repetition. 1/2-1/2










Move
   

Paehtz, Thomas Sr (2450) - Schipkov, Boris [D36]
Miskolc open 1989

1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 c6 7. Bd3 Nbd7 8. Qc2 Nh5 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Nge2 g6 11. O-O-O Ndf6 12. h3 Ng7 13. g4 Be6 14. Kb1 O-O-O 15. f3 Kb8 16. e4 c5 17. g5 Nfe8 18. exd5 Bxd5 19. Nxd5 Rxd5 20. Be4 Rxg5 21. h4 Rg2 22. dxc5 Nf6 23. c6 Rc8 24. Qd3 bxc6 25. Nf4 Rg3 26. Rhe1 Qc7 27. Qc3 Nge8 28. Rc1 Nxe4 29. Rxe4 Nd6 30. Rb4+ Ka8 31. Qe3 Nf5 32. Qf2 Qe7 33. Re4 Qd6 34. Ra4 Rc7 35. Qe2 Qe7 36. Re4 Qd7 37. Re8+ Rc8 38. Rxc8+ Qxc8 39. Nd5 Qd7 40. Qa6 Qb7 41. Qa3 Rg2 42. b3 Nd4 43. Qf8+ Qb8 44. Qxf7 Qc8 45. Ne7 Qd7 46. Qc4 Qxe7 47. Qxd4 Kb7 48. a4 Rh2 49. a5 Qe6 50. a6+ Kxa6 51. Qa4+ Kb7 52. Qb4+ Ka6 53. Rc5 Rh1+ 54. Kb2 Qe2+ 55. Rc2 Qe5+ 56. Rc3 Qe2+ 57. Rc2 Qe5+ 1/2-1/2


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