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Schipkov, Boris (2355) - Robovic, Saudin (2340) [E82]
Kecskemet 1991

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3








   
6...b6
The King's Indian Saemisch System.
7. Nge2 c5 8. d5 e6 9. Ng3 exd5 10. cxd5 h5








   
11. Be2 h4
This was the deciding game in the fight for first place in the tournament. Saudin Robovic is a hard-edged player. I like to attack and prefer aggressive openings.
12. Nf1 Nh7 13. Nd2 f5
White has some edge after 13...a6 14. a4 f5 15. exf5 gxf5 16. Bf4! Ng5 17. Nc4 Nf7 18. O-O, Bucur-Marin, ROM-ch 2005.
14. exf5 gxf5 15. O-O
15. Bf4 is more precise.








   
15...Nd7
Black must struggle for the important e5-outpost and continue 15...f4! 16. Bf2 h3 with counterplay.
16. f4
White defends the e5 and g5 squares and gets a small advantage.
16...Ndf6 17. h3 Qe7 18. Bf2 Ne4 19. Ndxe4 fxe4








   
20. Be3!?
Slightly risky. But how could we live without passion, emotions, adventures? And certainly it is not the Russian Roulette: if Black grabs the pawn then White obtains the advantage of two bishops in return.
20...Bxc3
Black accepts the challenge.
21. bxc3 Qg7 22. Kh1 Qxc3 23. Bd2 Qg7 24. Qe1 Qh6
Better is 24...Qg3! 25. Bc4 Bd7 26. a4 Qxe1 27. Bxe1 with counterplay in the endgame.
This position after 24...Qh6 is suited for the testing of the computer chess programs. Fritz 5.32 gives -0.47 (25.Bb5 and 25.g4), Fritz 8 gives -0.13 (25.g4), and only Fritz 9 prefers White +0.23 (25.g4).








   
25. g4!!
White attacks! The text was unexpected for the audience in the tournament hall. But this is a winning move!
25...hxg3
After 25...Bb7 White can also advance his pawns on the kingside 26. Kh2 (26. Bc4) 26...Rae8 27. g5 Qg6 28. Qxh4 e3 29. Bc3 Bxd5 30. Qh6!? Qxh6 31. gxh6.
26. Qxg3+ Kh8 27. Bc3+ Nf6 28. f5!
White intends to add his rook to the assault forces.








   
28...Kh7
White continues his powerful attack on the black king even in the ending after 28...Rg8 29. Qxd6 Qxh3+ 30. Qh2 Qxh2+ 31. Kxh2 Kg7 32. Rg1+ Kf7 33. Rxg8 Nxg8 34. d6.
29. Rf4
White could also win with 29. Qg6+ Qxg6 30. fxg6+ Kxg6 31. Rxf6+ Rxf6 32. Rg1+ Kf7 33. Bh5+ Ke7 34. Rg7+.
29...Rg8 30. Qh4








   
30...Qxh4
The stubborn 30...Nxd5 is hopeless too: 31. Bc4! Bb7 32. Bxd5 Bxd5 33. Rd1 Bb7 34. Qxh6+ Kxh6 35. Rxd6+ Kg5 36. Rg4+ Kh5 (36...Kxf5 37. Rf6#) 37. Bg7 e3+ 38. Kh2.
31. Rxh4+ Kg7 32. Rg1+
White pounces on the black monarch with all his rooks and bishops.
32...Kf7 33. Rxg8 Nxg8 34. Rh7+ Kf8








   
35. Bh5
The mighty bishops.
35...Ne7 36. f6
White checkmates: 36...Ng8 37. f7 Be6 38. dxe6 Nh6 39. Rh8+ Ke7 40. Re8+ Rxe8 41. fxe8=R.
I solely occupied first place in this tournament with 8.5 from 12, 2nd Saudin Robovic 8, 3-6 shared Peter Leko, Laszlo Krizsany, Vasilij Malyshev and Tibor Karolyi 7 points. The future World Vice-Champion Peter Leko did not lose a game. Robovic won 8 games and lost 4.
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Schipkov, Boris (2355) - Robovic, Saudin (2340) [E82]
Kecskemet/Kecskemet (4) 1991

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 b6 7. Nge2 c5 8. d5 e6 9. Ng3 exd5 10. cxd5 h5 11. Be2 h4 12. Nf1 Nh7 13. Nd2 f5 14. exf5 gxf5 15. O-O Nd7 16. f4 Ndf6 17. h3 Qe7 18. Bf2 Ne4 19. Ndxe4 fxe4 20. Be3 Bxc3 21. bxc3 Qg7 22. Kh1 Qxc3 23. Bd2 Qg7 24. Qe1 Qh6 25. g4 hxg3 26. Qxg3+ Kh8 27. Bc3+ Nf6 28. f5 Kh7 29. Rf4 Rg8 30. Qh4 Qxh4 31. Rxh4+ Kg7 32. Rg1+ Kf7 33. Rxg8 Nxg8 34. Rh7+ Kf8 35. Bh5 Ne7 36. f6 1-0


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