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How To Play Against A Novelty

Schipkov, Boris (2355) - Siklosi, Zoltan (2280) [E25]
Kecskemet 1992

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qd3








   
8...b6!
This good theoretical novelty was made in Shirov, Alexei - Karpov, Anatoly, Biel 1992, a couple of weeks before my game against the strong IM Zoltan Siklosi. I knew about the Shirov-Karpov game only a month later, because I had no computer, databases and Internet then in 1992.
How must we react to the rival's new move in an opening? First, we have to understand a positional idea of this new move. Here we see that Black wants to exchange his light-squared bishop and weakens the White's camp. Second, we must select and consider several reasonable moves, candidates. Now we see only one wise move.
9. e4
Logical. White seizes the center.
9...Ba6








   
10. c4!
The critical moment. In the position on the diagram I thought about two candidates: 10.Qd2 and 10.c4. 10.Qd2 is simpler, it keeps the pawn center, also White wins a tempo if Black trades the bishops, because Black makes two moves ...Ba6 and ...Bxf1, White - one Kxf1. But White loses his pair of bishops and the light squares became weak. In the game Shirov-Karpov, Biel 1992 White played 10. Qd2 Bxf1 11. Kxf1 Ne7 12. Ne2 Nbc6 13. dxc5 Qc7! 14. Qf4 e5 15. Qg4 O-O and after 16. Kf2? (16. Bh6!? Ng6 17. h4) Na5 17. cxb6 Qxb6+ 18. Be3 Qc6 19. Rhd1 Nc4 Black won in 39 moves.
After long meditation I preferred 10.c4. This is more complicated than 10.Qd2, 10.c4 stops the main plan of Black and keeps the two bishops that is good in the endgame. We know that often the best move prevents from opponent's threats or ideas. I also supposed that my rival had completely analysed the obvious 10.Qd2.
10...Nf6
10...Ne7 is also possible. After 11. d5 exd5 12. exd5 O-O 13. Bb2 Nd7 14. O-O-O Nc8 (14...Rb8!?) 15. Qc3 Qg5+ 16. Kb1 Nd6 17. Nh3 (17. h4!?) Qf6 18. Qc2 (18. Qe1) Qd8 19. Bd3 Qh4 20. f4 b5, Miton, K - Sulskis, S, Koszalin 1998 or 11. dxc5 Qxd3 12. Bxd3 Nd7 13. cxb6 axb6 14. Be3 O-O, Neven, K - Cummings, D, Richmond CAN-ch zt 2002, the chances are about even.
11. dxc5!?
White chooses a quiet continuation.








   
11...Nbd7
Here I understood that my plot has took. Zoltan was engrossed in thoughts. Also playable was 11...Qxd3!? 12. Bxd3 Nbd7!? (12...bxc5 13. e5 Nd5 14. f4 Nd7 15. Bd2 Rb8 (15...g5 16. Nh3 gxf4 17. cxd5 Bxd3 18. Nxf4 Bc4 19. dxe6 fxe6 20. Rc1 Ba2 21. O-O O-O) 16. Nh3 Rb3 (16...N5b6) 17. Bc2 Bxc4 18. Bxb3 Bxb3 19. Ng5 Ke7 20. Rc1 f6 21. exf6+ gxf6 22. Ne4 with a small edge to White) 13. cxb6 Ne5 14. Be2 axb6 15. Be3 Nfd7 with more or less equal ending.
12. cxb6 Qxb6?!
Black plays as Karpov. 12...axb6 is more precise.
13. Be3 Qc7
After 13...Qc6 14. Rc1 O-O 15. Ne2 Nc5 16. Qc2 Rab8 17. Nd4 Qb6 18. Be2 White has an advantage.








   
14. Qc3!
White found the strongest plan.
14...O-O 15. c5!
White advances his extra pawn, trades the passive bishop and so develops his kingside.
15...Bxf1 16. Kxf1 Rfc8
Or 16...Rac8 17. Rc1 Ne5 18. Ne2 Nfd7 19. Bd4 f6 20. Nf4 Rce8 (20...Kf7 21. g3, 20...Rfe8 21. Be3) 21. g3 and White is better.
17. Rc1








   
17...Qc6
White obtains a clear edge and in other cases: 17...Ne5 18. Ne2 Nfd7 19. Bd4, and 17...Nb8 18. Ne2 Nc6 19. Kf2, and 17...a5 18. Ne2 Ra6 19. Nf4 (19. Nd4) 19...Ne5 20. Nd3 Nxd3 21. Qxd3 Rc6 22. Rd1 h6 23. Kf2.
18. Ne2 Rc7 19. Kf2 Rac8 20. Rhd1!
The point. White ends the development of his pieces.








   
20...h6
Necessary. Black cannot take the c5-pawn 20...Nxc5? 21. Qxc5 Qxc5 22. Rxc5 Rxc5 23. Bxc5 Rxc5, because White mates with 24. Rd8+ Ne8 25. Rxe8.
21. Rd6 Qa8
If 21...Qxd6 then 22. cxd6 Rxc3 23. Rxc3 Rxc3 24. Nxc3 Ne8 25. Bxa7 Nxd6 26. a4 and White wins in the ending.
22. c6 Nb8 23. Nd4! Ne8








   
24. e5!
A nice move in mutual time trouble. Total domination.
24...Re7 25. Qa5 Nc7 26. g4!
White has played in the center and on the queenside and now attacks on the kingside a la Alekhine.








   
26...Kh7 27. g5 Nd5 28. gxh6 Nxe3
Or 28...g6 29. Rxd5 exd5 30. Qxd5 Rd7 31. Qe4 Nxc6 32. Nxc6 Rdc7 33. Qf4 f5 34. e6 Rxc6 35. Qe5, winning.
29. Kxe3








   
29...Kxh6
If 29...gxh6 then 30. c7 Nd7 31. Nc6, winning.
30. c7
According to the plan. White could win with 30. Nf5+ Kh7 31. Nxe7, with 30. c7 Kh7 31. Qe1 or with 30. Qe1.
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Schipkov, Boris (2355) - Siklosi, Zoltan (2280) [E25]
Kecskemet 1992

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qd3 b6! This good theoretical novelty was made in Shirov, Alexei - Karpov, Anatoly, Biel 1992, a couple of weeks before my game against the strong IM Zoltan Siklosi. 9. e4 Logical. White seizes the center. Ba6 10. c4! Nf6 11. dxc5!? Nbd7 12. cxb6 Qxb6?! 13. Be3 Qc7 14. Qc3! O-O 15. c5! White advances his extra pawn, trades the passive bishop and so develops his kingside. Bxf1 16. Kxf1 Rfc8 17. Rc1 Qc6 18. Ne2 Rc7 19. Kf2 Rac8 20. Rhd1! The point. White ends the development of his pieces. h6 21. Rd6 Qa8 22. c6 Nb8 23. Nd4! Ne8 24. e5! A nice move in mutual time trouble. Total domination. Re7 25. Qa5 Nc7 26. g4! White has played in the center and on the queenside and now attacks on the kingside a la Alekhine. Kh7 27. g5 Nd5 28. gxh6 Nxe3 29. Kxe3 Kxh6 30. c7 1-0


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