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Theoreticians Know All. The Slav Classic, the Pressure on the Centre, Two Weaknesses and a Fighting Spirit

Vasilchenko, Oleg (2455) - Schipkov, Boris (2355) [D11]
Kecskemet 1991

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 Bf5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Bg2 h6 7. O-O Nbd7 8. Nd2 Be7 9. e4 dxe4 10. Ndxe4 Nxe4 11. Nxe4 O-O 12. Bf4








   
12...Nf6!
Here Oleg Vasilchenko offered me a draw. But I decided to play. Why? The position is equal. However from the classic point of view Black has no weaknesses, White has one - the d4-pawn. I can attack the central white pawn with all my pieces. And I am one of the two authors of the solid book on the Slav Defence - "Winning With The Slav". So I thought I knew the Slav Defence and understood the arising positions much better than a great many grandmasters. For example, I thought I knew the line 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 Nbd7 7. Nxc4 Nb6 better than GM Boris Gelfand, a future challenger for the World Chess Crown.
13. Nc3 Qb6!
My plan is crystal clear - to double the rooks on the d-file to increase the pressure on the d4-pawn.
14. Na4 Qb4 15. b3 Be4!
Usually one weakness is not enough for victory or even for a real advantage. Therefore I exchanges the light-squared bishop to weaken White's kingside. My good dark-squared bishop can attack the d4-pawn is stronger than White's. 15...Qa5 is also possible.
16. Bxe4 Nxe4 17. Qd3 Nf6 18. Rfd1 Qa5








   
19. Be5
19. Nc5!? Bxc5 20. dxc5 Rfd8 21. Bd6 Rd7 is playable.
19...Rfd8 20. Qf3 Nd7 21. Bf4 Qf5 22. Kg2 Rac8 23. Nc3 Nf6 24. Be3 Qa5 25. Rdc1








   
25...Rd7!
Black doubles his rooks according to the plan.
26. Rc2 Rcd8 27. h3 Bb4!?
27...Ne8 and 27...Nh7 are possible too.
28. Ne2
28. Ne4!? deserves attention.








   
28...Be7
Now I could convert one advantage to another with the powerful 28...e5! 29. dxe5 Qxe5 30. Rac1 Ne4 31. h4 f5, and here Black seized the open file and had a strong knight in the centre.
29. Nc3 Qc7 30. Ne2 Ne8 31. Rb1!
Oleg finds a good idea.
31...Bf6








   
32. b4!
White obtains counterplay on the queenside.
32...a6 33. a4 Ra8 34. Rcc1 Qd8 35. Qg4 Kh8 36. Qf3








   
36...Nd6!
Threatening ...Nf5 Black forces White to weaken his kingside.
37. g4 Kg8 38. Ng3








   
38...Rc8
Time trouble. The practice is not the ideal theory, and a theoretician can meet with the harsh truth of life. Black had two nice knight manoeuvres: 38...Ne8!? 39. Ne2 Nc7 and 38...Nc8!? 39. Ne2 Ne7.
39. Rc2 a5
White keeps the game after 39...b5 40. axb5 axb5 41. cxb5 cxb5 42. Rc5 Nc4 43. Ra1 Rb8 44. Bf4 Rbb7 (or 44...Bxd4 45. Bxb8 Bxa1 46. Rxb5, with counterplay) 45. Rxb5 Rxb5 46. Ra8.
40. bxa5 Ne8?!
40...Qxa5 is correct, 41. c5 Ne8 42. Rcb2, with counterchances.
41. Rcb2! Qxa5?!
41...c5 is more precise.
42. Rxb7?!
42. Ne4! is better.
42...Rxb7 43. Rxb7 Qxa4 44. c5 Nc7 45. Ne4 Nd5








   
46. Rxf7!?
In the position on the diagram we see that Black realized his plan. We see two weaknesses in the White's camp: the d4-pawn and the kingside. But White has two possible tactical tricks thanks to the strong rook on b7: the text and 46. Bxh6!? Qxd4 47. Be3 Qe5 48. Rxf7 Kxf7 49. Nd6+ Kf8 50. Nxc8 Nxe3+ 51. Qxe3 Qd5+ 52. Kh2 Be5+ 53. Kg1 Qd1+ 54. Kg2 Qd5+, with equality.
46...Kxf7 47. Nd6+ Kg8 48. Nxc8 Bxd4 49. Qe4








   
49...Nxe3+!
Black trades his knight. After ...Bxc5 the bishop cuts off White's knight from all squares.
50. fxe3 Qa2+ 51. Kf3! Bxc5 52. Qxc6 Qc4!








   
53. Qe8+?
White's queen tries to help the knight. But 53. Kg3! is the only move.
53...Kh7 54. Ne7 Qf1+ 55. Ke4
Or 55. Kg3 Bd6+ 56. Kh4 g5+ 57. Kh5 Qxh3 checkmate.
55...Qb1+ 56. Kf3 Qb7+ 57. Nc6 Qb3
White cannot defend his e3-pawn, weak kingside and king.








   
58. Qf7
Black mates after 58...Qxe3+ 59. Kg2 Qg1+ 60. Kf3 Qf2+ 61. Ke4 Qe3.
White resigned. 0-1










Move
   

Vasilchenko, Oleg (2455) - Schipkov, Boris (2355) [D11]
Kecskemet 1991

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 Bf5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Bg2 h6 7. O-O Nbd7 8. Nd2 Be7 9. e4 dxe4 10. Ndxe4 Nxe4 11. Nxe4 O-O 12. Bf4 Here Oleg Vasilchenko offered me a draw. But I decided to play. Why? The game is equal. However from the classic point of view Black has no weaknesses, White has one - the d4-pawn. Nf6! 13. Nc3 Qb6! My plan is crystal clear - to double the rooks on the d-file to increase the pressure on the d4-pawn. 14. Na4 Qb4 15. b3 Be4! Usually one weakness is not enough for victory or even for a real advantage. Therefore I exchanges the light-squared bishop to weaken White's kingside. 16. Bxe4 Nxe4 17. Qd3 Nf6 18. Rfd1 Qa5 19. Be5 Rfd8 20. Qf3 Nd7 21. Bf4 Qf5 22. Kg2 Rac8 23. Nc3 Nf6 24. Be3 Qa5 25. Rdc1 Rd7! Black doubles his rooks according to the plan. 26. Rc2 Rcd8 27. h3 Bb4 28. Ne2 Be7 Now I could convert one advantage to another with the powerful 28...e5! 29. dxe5 Qxe5 30. Rac1 Ne4 31. h4 f5. 29. Nc3 Qc7 30. Ne2 Ne8 31. Rb1! Oleg finds a good idea. Bf6 32. b4! White has counterplay on the queenside. a6 33. a4 Ra8 34. Rcc1 Qd8 35. Qg4 Kh8 36. Qf3 Nd6! Threatening ...Nf5 Black forces White to weaken his kingside. 37. g4 Kg8 38. Ng3 Rc8 Time trouble. The practice is not the ideal theory, and a theoretician can meet with the harsh truth of life. Black had two nice knight manoeuvres: 38...Ne8!? 39. Ne2 Nc7 and 38...Nc8!? 39. Ne2 Ne7. 39. Rc2 a5 40. bxa5 Ne8?! 40...Qxa5 is correct, 41. c5 Ne8 42. Rcb2, with counterchances. 41. Rcb2 Qxa5?! 41...c5 is more precise. 42. Rxb7?! 42. Ne4! is better. Rxb7 43. Rxb7 Qxa4 44. c5 Nc7 45. Ne4 Nd5 46. Rxf7!? Black realized his plan. Two weaknesses in the White's camp: the d4-pawn and the kingside. But White has two tactical tricks due to the strong rook: the text and 46. Bxh6!? Qxd4 47. Be3 Qe5 48. Rxf7 Kxf7 49. Nd6+ Kf8 50. Nxc8 Nxe3+ 51. Qxe3 Qd5+ 52. Kh2 Be5+ 53. Kg1 Qd1+ 54. Kg2 Qd5+, with equality. Kxf7 47. Nd6+ Kg8 48. Nxc8 Bxd4 49. Qe4 Nxe3+! Black exchanges his knight. After ...Bxc5 the bishop cuts off White's knight from all squares. 50. fxe3 Qa2+ 51. Kf3! Bxc5 52. Qxc6 Qc4! 53. Qe8+? White's queen tries to help the knight. But 53. Kg3! is the only move. Kh7 54. Ne7 Qf1+ 55. Ke4 Qb1+ 56. Kf3 Qb7+ 57. Nc6 Qb3 White cannot defend his e3-pawn, weak kingside and king. 58. Qf7 0-1


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