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World Chess Championship 2016 Match Magnus Carlsen against Sergey Karjakin, New York 2016

by Boris Schipkov

The World Chess Championship 2016 Match - Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin - took place in New York City (USA) 11th-30th November at the Fulton Market Building in the South Street Seaport. 12 classical games plus tie-break games.
Magnus Carlsen - Sergey Karjakin 6-6, tie-break 3-1, total score 9-7. Magnus Carlsen is World Chess Champion again, he retains World Championship title.

Tie-break: Rapid Game 4: Carlsen-Karjakin 1-0. The Sicilian Defence. Magnus Carlsen won the exchange, ended this game with a beautiful queen sacrifice 50.Qh6+!!.
Rapid Game 3: Karjakin-Carlsen 0-1. The Spanish Game. Magnus attacked on the kingside, queenside and in the centre! Sergey made mistakes and lost.
Rapid Game 2: Carlsen-Karjakin 1/2. The Italian Game. Magnus preferred 8.Re1, in game 5 he played 8.b4. Carlsen had a small advantage after 19.Rxa4. Karjakin made a mistake, 23...cxb5?. Two bishops vs a rook + a pawn. Magnus could have won with 62.Kf7!, with 73.Be6+! and 75.Bc5!.
Rapid Game 1: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. The Spanish Game as usual, but Magnus played 9...Nb8 and 10...c5 with the idea to counterattack on the queenside to seize space. 12...Rb8 is a novelty. With equality. The endgame is drawish. A draw in 37 moves.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Tie-break Rapid Games: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 12: Carlsen-Karjakin 1/2. The Spanish Game, Berlin Variation again, like in game 3, but in this day Magnus chose the usual 10.Re1. Magnus preferred 15.Na3 (a novelty), in the game Carlsen-Anand, Chennai (8) 2013 he played 15.Nd2. With equality. A draw in 30 moves. Tie-break - 30th November.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 12: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 11: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. The Spanish Game. Magnus preferred 9...Be6 (9...Na5 was in game 2). With equality. 14...c5 was a novelty. Magnus counterattacked on the queenside with 17...c4, then in the centre with 19...d5. A draw by perpetual check.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 11: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 10: Carlsen-Karjakin 1-0. The Spanish Game, Berlin Variation, 3...Nf6 4.d3. 10.Bxe7 is a novelty (10. Bg3 Fedorchuk-Delorme, Paris-ch blitz 2011). Unclear. Magnus Carlsen outplayed the rival in the endgame.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 10: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 9: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. The Spanish Game again, but Magnus preferred 6...Bc5 (6...d6 in game 2, 6.O-O in games 4, 6) and sacrificed a pawn. A theoretical duel. 21...cxb3 is a novelty, in Nakamura-Kasimdzhanov, Tromso 2014 Black played 21...c3. Sergey Karjakin obtained a small advantage with 24.Rg1. A draw in 74 moves.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 9: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 8: Carlsen-Karjakin 0-1. And Carlsen played 1.d4! The Queen's Pawn Game. Magnus fianchettoed the dark-squared bishop, and Sergey continued 7...b6. Karjakin didn't want to play with hanging pawns, preferred 8...Bxc5. 11...dxc4 is a novelty. With equality after 17...Ng6. However, after mistakes Carlsen lost to Karjakin in the endgame.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 8: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 7: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. Wow! Karjakin played 1.d4. The Slav Defence, then the Queen's Gambit Accepted. In 2013 Sergey Karjakin preferred 5.Nf3 vs Solak, today chose 5.Bd3. Carlsen played 10...Nc6, a rare move, and Karjakin without home preparation made a mistake, 11.Nd2?, a strange continuation. After this Magnus Carlsen had a small advantage in development, but the aggressive 15...f5! was better. Then Carlsen made a mistake, 16...Rc8?, and Karjakin obtained a small edge with 17.Nf6+!, grabbed a pawn. However, the endgame was drawish due to the opposite-colored bishops.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 7: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 6: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. The Spanish Game. Magnus sacrificed a pawn with 9...d5. 14...c5 was a novelty. Magnus Carlsen had sufficient compensation for the pawn: the powerful light-squared bishop. The opposite-colored bishops endgame (with queens) was drawn.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 6: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 5: Carlsen-Karjakin 1/2. The Italian Game. Magnus Carlsen seized space on the queenside with 8.b4. The move 12.h3 was a novelty. Unclear. In the endgame Sergey Karjakin counterattacked on the kingside, activated the bishop, had better chances.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 5: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 4: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. The Spanish Game. Sergey preferred 6.Re1, Magnus played 8...Bb7. A theoretical duel. 14.N3h2?! was a dubious novelty, Magnus easily equalized with 14...d5!. After 18.Bxh6 Qc6! Karjakin made a mistake 19.Bxc4? and Carlsen obtained a clear edge with 19...bxc4. But then 21...Nxg3 or 21...Qg6 was somewhat better. In any case Magnus had real chances to win the game. A draw in 94 moves.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 4: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 3: Carlsen-Karjakin 1/2. The Spanish Game, Berlin Variation. A sharp fight, hehe! 10.Re2 is a rare move, usually White plays 10.Re1, e.g. Carlsen-Anand, Chennai (8) 2013. 11...Re8 is a novelty, 11...Nb7 was in Kasimdzhanov-Melkumyan, Bundesliga 2016. In the endgame Magnus had a slight advantage, but after the strange 17.g3 Sergey equalized with 17...g5. However after Karjakin's mistakes Carlsen could have won with 70.Re8, 71.Re1 and 72.Rf7+. A draw in 78 moves.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 3: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 2: Karjakin-Carlsen 1/2. The Spanish Game. With equality. This line was popular in 2014-2016, Magnus beat Topalov after 12...Nc6 in 2016 in Paris, here he preferred 12...Re8. 13.Ra1= was a new move.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 2: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Game 1: Carlsen-Karjakin 1/2. The Trompowsky Attack. A rare opening, Magnus tried to surprise the rival a little, and 8.Nd2 was a novelty (Magnus played the Trompowsky Attack 12 times, beat Kramnik after 5...e6 6.Nf3 in 2013, Tal Memorial). However Sergey had sufficient counterplay after 12...Bd7. The endgame looked drawish, maybe Magnus had a tiny advantage due to a better pawn structure. A draw in 42 moves.
Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 1: World Chess Championship, New York 2016

Games, Carlsen-Karjakin match, New York 2016 (16, pgn)

All 16 games, Carlsen-Karjakin match, New York 2016

Schedule, games: November 11, 12; 14, 15; 17, 18; 20, 21; 23, 24; 26; 28; tie-break 30.

Before the match: World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway, Challenger Sergey Karjakin of Russia.

World Chess Championship 2014 Match Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand, Sochi 2014

World Chess Championship 2013 Match Viswanathan Anand against Magnus Carlsen, Chennai 2013

World Chess Champions

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